Members Login
 

Topic: History (controversial and otherwise)

Post Info
High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
History (controversial and otherwise)
Permalink  
 

So more than a few of us are History buffs and one or two of us have even studied it. So I think we need a place where we can discuss it freely. Be it WWII, the Crusades, Stone Age or even modern history. 

Let's not fight, but let's also not be afraid to speak our minds. The study of history needs one to remain neutral and distanced. For example being rased a Christian I automatically support the Christians when reading of the Crusades. However study reveals that in many instances the so called Christians were even worse than their Muslim enemies and acts of atrocity were commited by both sides. 

So with this amazingly well done speech by a very evil man (in fictional media so as to not offend anyone) let us begin! 



__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Lady Of The Blue Winter Rose
Status: Offline
Posts: 2611
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

So more than a few of us are History buffs and one or two of us have even studied it. So I think we need a place where we can discuss it freely. Be it WWII, the Crusades, Stone Age or even modern history. 

For example being rased a Christian I automatically support the Christians when reading of the Crusades. However study reveals that in many instances the so called Christians were even worse than their Muslim enemies and acts of atrocity were commited by both sides. 

So with this amazingly well done speech by a very evil man (in fictional media so as to not offend anyone) let us begin! 


 Being raised Christian/Protestant, we were lead to believe the Crusades were fought by the Catholics ordered by Pope Urban the II, the French King at the time and Catholic Church in England.  There may be some differences between how we, were taught.



-- Edited by Lyanna Stark on Tuesday 30th of October 2012 03:35:32 PM

__________________

Rhaegar, despite wounding Robert, was struck down with a massive blow from Robert's warhammer, which scattered the rubies encrusted in Rhaegar's armor under the water.  Rhaegar died with Lyanna Stark's name on his lips.

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Cept for some heretical factions that count, the Catholic church was the only Christian power. Hence me saying that. In all fairness though, if I were a medieval knight I would probably have joined the Crusades. The way Pope Urban the Innocent marketed it was genius! Pure propaganda highly effective!

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 

Aegon, tell me you read Amin Maalouf's The Crusades Through Arab Eyes. I'm sure many other authors touch on this subject from a similar perspective, but man, this is a must read for anyone interested in the Crusades. 

Luckily I had great teachers when it came to medieval history, and they helped us a lot with seeing things in a different light. 

I'm a Christian but what are those Christian rulers and their knights to me? Absolutely nothing, so I'm not in any way attached to them *or* the values they held. The fact that I'm Orthodox and not Catholic is not a factor in this. BTW, Aegon, "Cept for some heretical factions that count, the Catholic church was the only Christian power" is not true. The Komnenian period (which coincided with the first crusades) was one of the peaks of the Byzantine Empire (Orthodox church, mind you), and that was a time when the western world was nothing compared to them, both culturally and economically speaking. Alas! byzantine history doesn't interest anyone.  

The Crusades were about political power and about giving those people a common enemy, or else they would have just carried on doing battle among themselves. In essence, it was a highly effective way of diffusing the tension inside their own kingdoms. And yes, they were butchers. The accounts of what they did when they entered Antioch and Jerusalem left us all speechless when we read it in class. There was nothing holy about that. But yes, an example of effective propaganda, then *and* now. You don't want to know how many books I've read that compare what's happening now in the Middle East with the oh so holy crusades. Fascinating, really. 



__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 

I guess it's cause I really like knights, western history and the idea of chivalry. Plus I also really like Richard the Lionheart and find him fascinating. The same goes for Salladin and the high regard with which these two men held one another. I loved the portrayal of Salladin in Kingdom of Heaven.
Ah you are indeed correct but you forget to mention that the First Crusade was launched at the insistence of the Emperor and the Greek Orthodox church.
Both sides committed atrocities, but Antioch is judged too harshly, from a military perspective it makes perfect sense just like the killing of the French prisoners during the battle of Agincourt. There's no excuse for Jerusalem though and the actions of Balian de Iblin to ensure something similar did not happen during the recapture are quite admirable.
btw has mr Macha seen this?



-- Edited by Aegon the Conqueror on Tuesday 30th of October 2012 08:43:52 PM

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Found this very intriguing story at the beginning of the Art of War, thought it was worth sharing.
Sun Tzu Wu was a native of the Ch`i State. His ART OF WAR brought him to the notice of Ho Lu, [2] King
of Wu. Ho Lu said to him: "I have carefully perused your 13 chapters. May I submit your theory of managing
soldiers to a slight test?" Sun Tzu replied: "You may." Ho Lu asked: "May the test be applied to women?" The
answer was again in the affirmative, so arrangements were made to bring 180 ladies out of the Palace. Sun
Tzu divided them into two companies, and placed one of the King's favorite concubines at the head of each.
He then bade them all take spears in their hands, and addressed them thus: "I presume you know the
difference between front and back, right hand and left hand?" The girls replied: Yes. Sun Tzu went on: "When
I say "Eyes front," you must look straight ahead. When I say "Left turn," you must face towards your left
hand. When I say "Right turn," you must face towards your right hand. When I say "About turn," you must
face right round towards your back." Again the girls assented. The words of command having been thus
explained, he set up the halberds and battle-axes in order to begin the drill. Then, to the sound of drums, he
gave the order "Right turn." But the girls only burst out laughing. Sun Tzu said: "If words of command are not
clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, then the general is to blame." So he started drilling
them again, and this time gave the order "Left turn," whereupon the girls once more burst into fits of laughter.
Sun Tzu: "If words of command are not clear and distinct, if orders are not thoroughly understood, the general
is to blame. But if his orders ARE clear, and the soldiers nevertheless disobey, then it is the fault of their
officers." So saying, he ordered the leaders of the two companies to be beheaded. Now the king of Wu was
watching the scene from the top of a raised pavilion; and when he saw that his favorite concubines were about
to be executed, he was greatly alarmed and hurriedly sent down the following message: "We are now quite
satisfied as to our general's ability to handle troops. If We are bereft of these two concubines, our meat and
drink will lose their savor. It is our wish that they shall not be beheaded." Sun Tzu replied: "Having once
received His Majesty's commission to be the general of his forces, there are certain commands of His Majesty
which, acting in that capacity, I am unable to accept." Accordingly, he had the two leaders beheaded, and
straightway installed the pair next in order as leaders in their place. When this had been done, the drum was
sounded for the drill once more; and the girls went through all the evolutions, turning to the right or to the left,
marching ahead or wheeling back, kneeling or standing, with perfect accuracy and precision, not venturing to
utter a sound. Then Sun Tzu sent a messenger to the King saying: "Your soldiers, Sire, are now properly
drilled and disciplined, and ready for your majesty's inspection. They can be put to any use that their
sovereign may desire; bid them go through fire and water, and they will not disobey." But the King replied:
"Let our general cease drilling and return to camp. As for us, We have no wish to come down and inspect the
troops." Thereupon Sun Tzu said: "The King is only fond of words, and cannot translate them into deeds."
After that, Ho Lu saw that Sun Tzu was one who knew how to handle an army, and finally appointed him
general. In the west, he defeated the Ch`u State and forced his way into Ying, the capital; to the north he put
fear into the States of Ch`i and Chin, and spread his fame abroad amongst the feudal princes. And Sun Tzu
shared in the might of the King.

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Braavosi Water Dancer
Status: Offline
Posts: 1815
Date:
Permalink  
 

Maybe I shouldn't comment cause my blood is boiling right now. spiderkill

How can you even compare them when one side was defending themselves against a horde of warlords and fortune seekers a callous religious leader in another continent decided to entice to go to their front door with anihilation orders so that they wouldn't disturb the neighbourhood back home? disbelief.gif

No, I just can't talk about this calmly. I'm sorry. I better leave this thread.

 



__________________

“Fear is a strange soil. It grows obedience like corn, which grow in straight lines to make weeding easier. But sometimes it grows the potatoes of defiance, which flourish underground.”

― Terry Pratchett, Small Gods.

 
 

 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

 Plus I also really like Richard the Lionheart and find him fascinating. 


btw has mr Macha seen this? 


 Aegon. Honey. We need to talk about this. Sit here and tell me why do you like Richard so much. *goes into The Wire mode* Cause that shit ain't right! 

Kidding. But seriously now. What i find fascinating is the fascination that people have with Richard. He's mostly regarded as this great figure when - except for his military skils, and I'll get tot that in a moment - he was lousy in every other aspect. King of England...really?He couldn't care less about England, he didn't even like the place. He was a bad ruler, a cruel man and his ambitions got the better of him. Firts rebellion against his father? Epic fail. He had nothing of his father's brilliance. He just squeezed England and his posessions in France to allow him to go play soldier in the Holy Land..where he did what exactly? Acre was captured (and I meant the siege of Antioch in my previous comment, not what Richard did with his prisoners at Acre), and he quarrelled with Saladin for a while, accomplishing what? Not that much. But then, Richard quarelled with everyone, and with his allies the most. See, this is what makes a great ruler: the ability to keep the peace, appease and keep his allies and leave everyone else to do their work. Richard was a conqueror, and not even a great one at that - this is my opinion. Because really, taking prisoners without realizing he can't keep them, only to butcher them shortly after? No, it doesn't make sense form a military perspective. He was just cleaning his own mess. He was a soldier and nothing else. For God's sake, the man couldn't return safely from his crusade. 

But Saladin? I agree with you on Saladin. Now that is a great conqueror. He's my baby. 

I meant the siege of Antioch and the massacre there in my previous comment, were you referring to Richard's episode with the prisoners at Acre when you said it's being judged too harshly?

Thanks for the heads-up on that trailer. Mr. Macha hasn't played RTW in a long time now but he was in love with it. And Carthage? He's gonna go ballistic over that. He specialized in Roman & Hellenistic history so that's a winner for him. 

 

Edit: Wow, lovely fragment, Aegon. Couldn't you find something in The Art of War that didn't involve the beheading of women? 



-- Edited by Macha on Wednesday 31st of October 2012 08:03:30 AM

__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Tir consider my opening statement for this section of the comments. Keep emotions out of the discussion. Fact remains it happened for various reasons, both sides did things that would be classified as war crimes today. It doesn't affect any one of us, so please keep emotions out of it and let's discuss it in a calm and detached manner.

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Ok Macha to answer this question will take a lot of typing for which I don't have time now, so I will just quote my favourite Historical Novellist on this. I never said he was a good king, but he was a fascinating man!
Anyways here goes Sharon Penman
"Richard I was never one of my favorite kings, although my knowledge of him was admittedly superficial. I saw him as one-dimensional, drunk on blood and glory, arrogant, ruthless, a brilliant battle commander, but an ungrateful son and a careless king, and that is the Richard who made a brief appearance in Here in Dragons. I saw no reason not to accept the infamous verdict of the nineteenth century historian, William Stubbs, that he was “a bad son, a bad husband, a bad king.”

So I was not expecting the Richard that I found when I began to research Devil’s Brood. I would eventually do a blog called “The Surprising Lionheart,” for after years of writing about real historical figures, I’d never before discovered such a disconnect between the man and the myth—at least not since I’d launched my writing career by telling the story of another king called Richard.

The more I learned about this Richard, the less I agreed with Dr Stubbs. I think Richard can fairly be acquitted of two of those three damning charges. I loved writing about Henry II. He was a great king—but a flawed father, and bears much of the blame for his estrangement from his sons. Certainly both Richard and Geoffrey had legitimate grievances, and it can be argued that they were driven to rebellion by Henry’s monu-mental mistakes; see Devil’s Brood. I bled for Henry, dying betrayed and brokenhearted at Chinon, but he brought so much of that grief upon himself.

Nor was Richard a bad king. Historians today give him higher marks than the Victorians did. Yes, he spent little time in England, but it was not the center of the uni-verse, was only part of the Angevin empire. After his return from his crusade and captivity in Germany, he found himself embroiled in a bitter war with the French king, and spent the last five years of his life defending his domains from Philippe Capet. The irony is that he has been criticized in our time for the very actions—his crusading and his military campaigns—that won him acclaim in his own world. By medieval standards, he was a successful king and historians now take that into consideration in passing judgment upon him.

He was, however, a bad husband, his infidelities notorious enough to warrant a lecture from the Bishop of Lincoln. Note that I say he was taken to task for adultery, not sodomy. I discussed the question of Richard’s sexuality at some length in the Author’s Note for Devil’s Brood, will not repeat it here since this Author’s Note is already going to rival a novella in length. Very briefly, the first suggestion that Richard preferred men to women as bedmates was not made until 1948, when it took root with surprising speed; I myself helped to perpetuate it in Here be Dragons, for I’d seen no need to do in-depth research for what was basically a walk-on role. But the actual “evidence” for this claim is very slight, indeed. I’ll address this issue again in A King’s Ransom, for that is where Richard will have his famous encounter with the hermit. The research I did for Devil’s Brood inclined me to be skeptical, and I am even more so after finishing Lionheart, for I had not realized the intensity of the hatred between Richard and Philippe. The French chroniclers accused Richard of arranging the murder of Conrad of Montferrat, of poison-ing the Duke of Burgundy, of plotting to kill Philippe by sending Assassins to Paris, of being bribed by the “godless infidels” and betraying Christendom by allying himself with Saladin. So why would they not have accused him of sodomy, a mortal sin in the Middle Ages, and a charge that would have stained his honor and imperiled his soul? If they’d had such a lethal weapon at hand, we can be sure they’d have made use of it.

Berengaria has remained in history’s shadows, a sad ghost, a neglected wife. She has not received the respect she deserves because her courage was the quiet kind; she was not a royal rebel like her formidable mother-in-law. She has been called a barren queen, unfairly blamed for the breakdown of her marriage. Since I knew of her unhappy marital history, I was somewhat surprised to discover that the marriage seems to have gotten off to a promising start. Because Richard shunned her company after he recovered his free-dom, I’d assumed this was true in the Holy Land, too. But Richard actually went to some trouble to have her with him when he could. It would have been easier and certainly safer to have had her stay in Acre instead of bringing her to Jaffa and, then, Latrun. We cannot be sure what caused their later estrangement, but I have some ideas; as a novelist, I have to, don’t I? I think we can safely say, though, that the greater blame was Richard’s.

What surprised me the most about Richard the man as opposed to Richard the myth? I already knew he was almost insanely reckless with his own safety, so it came as some-thing of a shock to learn that he was a cautious battle commander, that he took such care with the lives of his men. It is a fascinating paradox, and one which goes far toward explaining why he was loved by his soldiers, who seemed willing “to wade in blood to the pillars of Hercules if he so desired,” in the words of the chronicler Richard of Devizes.

It also surprised me to learn that his health was not robust, that he was often ill, for that makes his battlefield exploits all the more remarkable. The Richard of legend smolders like a torch, glowering, dour, and dangerous. But the Richard who comes alive in the chronicles had a sardonic sense of humor, could be playful and unpredictable; Baha al-Din reported that he habitually employed a bantering conversational style, so it wasn’t always easy to tell if he were serious or joking. And while I’d known he was well educated, able to jest in Latin and write poetry in two languages, I admit to being impressed when I discovered him quoting from Horace. Even his harshest critics acknowledge his military genius; he hasn’t always been given enough credit, though, for his intelligence. The mythical Richard is usually portrayed as a gung-ho warrior who cared only for blood, battles, and what he could win at the point of a sword, but the real Richard was no stranger to diplomatic strategy; he was capable of subtlety, too, and could be just as devious as his wily sire.

But I was most amazed by his behavior in the Holy Land, by his willingness to deal with the Saracens as he would have dealt with Christian foes, via negotiations and even a marital alliance. As tragic as the massacre of the Acre garrison was, it was done for what he considered valid military reasons, not because of religious bias, as I’d once thought. He was not the religious zealot I’d expected. The man who was the first prince to take the cross refused to lay siege to Jerusalem, alarmed his own allies by his cordial relations with the Saracens, and although he believed they were infidels, denied God’s Grace, he respected their courage. According to Baha al-Din, he formed friendships with some of Saladin’s elite Mamluks and emirs, even knighting several of them. That was the last thing I’d have imagined—knighting his infidel enemies in the midst of a holy war?

I don’t expect Lionheart to change the public perception of Richard I, any more than The Sunne in Splendour could compete with the Richard III of Shakespeare. But I do hope that my readers will agree with me that this Richard is much more complex and, therefore, more interesting, than the storied soldier-king. Perhaps I shouldn’t have been so surprised by what my research revealed. As an Australian friend, Glenne Gilbert, once observed astutely, “There had to be reasons why he was Eleanor’s favorite son.”

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Lady Of The Blue Winter Rose
Status: Offline
Posts: 2611
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

Tir consider my opening statement for this section of the comments. Keep emotions out of the discussion. Fact remains it happened for various reasons, both sides did things that would be classified as war crimes today. It doesn't affect any one of us, so please keep emotions out of it and let's discuss it in a calm and detached manner.


 Your Grace, asking a woman to take emotions out of any discussion is like asking water to not be wet, IMO.  Not gonna happen, sweetie. biggrin



__________________

Rhaegar, despite wounding Robert, was struck down with a massive blow from Robert's warhammer, which scattered the rubies encrusted in Rhaegar's armor under the water.  Rhaegar died with Lyanna Stark's name on his lips.

 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 
That's the problem with historical novelists, Aegon, especially those who focus on biographies. They can make anyone look good.

__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
He is still an interesting character. Hell I don't like Caligula at all, yet he's still a fascinating character. You forget that king Louis was to blame for a great deal of what transpired during the Third Crusade.
Emotions don't have a place in a discussion dealing with people who lived 800 years ago.

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Braavosi Water Dancer
Status: Offline
Posts: 1815
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

Tir consider my opening statement for this section of the comments. Keep emotions out of the discussion. Fact remains it happened for various reasons, both sides did things that would be classified as war crimes today. It doesn't affect any one of us, so please keep emotions out of it and let's discuss it in a calm and detached manner.


It does affect us Aegon. The reverberations of what happened still touch us today. And even if both armies commited "war crimes" that doesn't make the two sides equal. As I said, you can't put in the same level a side who was defending themselves and trying to protect their homeland with the horde of warlords and fortune seekers a callous religious leader in the other side of the world decided to entice to go to their front door with anihilation orders so that they wouldn't disturb the neighbourhood back home, among other reasons (which are even worse). And trying to whitewash them instead of acknowledging that the mere the crusade itself was a huge, shameful travesty, is a dangerous thing and should not be condoned. We can try to understand why it happened, discuss how it happened, the events that took place, we can try to learn from it, but we cannot condone that it happened.

That's as unemotional as I can put it, Aegon. I know you don't mean to offend me, but... don't patronise me. When you say you "side" with them, you're not leaving your emotions out of it either.



-- Edited by Tir Airgid on Wednesday 31st of October 2012 10:32:25 AM

__________________

“Fear is a strange soil. It grows obedience like corn, which grow in straight lines to make weeding easier. But sometimes it grows the potatoes of defiance, which flourish underground.”

― Terry Pratchett, Small Gods.

 
 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
When I say I side with them, I'm not saying what they did was right, I in no way condone the invasion of European barbarians. However it should be noted that those Muslims also invaded the Holy Land and took it from Christian and Jewish rulers. So right of conquest applies all round. If you can seize it, it's yours by right. Such are the rules of Conquest. What I mean is that if I were to live in the 1100's as a christian knight I too would have joined the Crusade. I said as much earlier. So in no way am I saying what they did was just, righteous or holy. Fact remains there is no such thing as a Holy war. Same goes for a Jihad though.
I leave you with a quote from Balian in Kingdom of Heaven, " None of us took this city from Muslims. No Muslim of the great army now coming against us was born when this city was lost. We fight over an offence we did not give, against those who were not alive to be offended."

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

He is still an interesting character. Hell I don't like Caligula at all, yet he's still a fascinating character. You forget that king Louis was to blame for a great deal of what transpired during the Third Crusade.
Emotions don't have a place in a discussion dealing with people who lived 800 years ago.


Well I didn't say you shouldn't find him interesting. But when you say "fascinating", that term has a positive connotation, hence my 'why do you like him so much?' retort. 

Emotions exist, you can't just keep them in check. Hell, I get pissed about a lot of things. Richard pisses me off, for example. I don't take it personal, and I can talk about any subject. This is fun for me. I'll get angry sometimes, other times I'll make fun of it. But this is why things are controversial. Let's defend our POVs, but let's not ask people "we talk about this without getting emotional, or we don't talk about this at all", it won't work. Also, I happen to like rants. As long as we don't attack each other, I'm willing to discuss these things in any manner. But please, don't dismiss people's opinions just because they're more visceral than yours. Just explain your point of view better. 

 





-- Edited by Macha on Wednesday 31st of October 2012 10:56:59 AM



-- Edited by Macha on Wednesday 31st of October 2012 10:57:26 AM

__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
I take offense when someone does not want to respond because their blood is boiling. Just ask me what I meant or to state something more clearly and I will.
Oh no I like Richard very much, a man's man. Nearly invincible in hand to hand combat, someone who often placed his troops' safety over his own many times. The battle of Jaffa was also quite stunning from a strategic pov and shows the strength of the man's character and his ability to keep his shit together in the midst of massive crises'. The most fascinating aspect of the Crusades for me though are the Poulain. The European Lords and Ladies who were born in the Holy Land and never saw Europe.
Oh bout the Art of War thing, haven't read much farther so I will look for other stories. But I do find that one to be quite interesting. When you lose, don't lose the lesson, the lesson here being never laugh at Sun Tzu.

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 



-- Edited by Aegon the Conqueror on Wednesday 31st of October 2012 11:01:12 AM

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Braavosi Water Dancer
Status: Offline
Posts: 1815
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

So right of conquest applies all round. If you can seize it, it's yours by right. Such are the rules of Conquest. 


I profoundly disagree with this statement. There isn't such a thing as a "right" of conquest. You might be able to do as you want with something if you are able to steal it and strong enough to hold it, but that doesn't give you a right over it. It is not "rightfully" yours. The only things that are rightfully yours are whatever you create with your own hands and mind. The rest you may possess whether it belongs to you or not. But it isn't your "right" to do so just cause you could take it.



__________________

“Fear is a strange soil. It grows obedience like corn, which grow in straight lines to make weeding easier. But sometimes it grows the potatoes of defiance, which flourish underground.”

― Terry Pratchett, Small Gods.

 
 

 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 
I need to check my facts on this but it is my impression that Jerusalem and other cities in the Holy Land were better off with the Muslin rule than they were under the Christians. I don't remember the muslims carrying off massacres at such a scale as the christians.

But Tir *did* answer, Aegon, and asked you a question. No need to get all defensive, she was only questioning your take on this, not attacking you.

__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

Braavosi Water Dancer
Status: Offline
Posts: 1815
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

I take offense when someone does not want to respond because their blood is boiling. Just ask me what I meant or to state something more clearly and I will.


 Again, I didn't mean to offend you and if I did, I apologize. That said, your dismissive answer offended me too. I am sure you didn't mean it, but it did.

I only wanted to clarify that even though my blood was boiling I thought my answer was civil and a reasonable statement. I didn't attack you, I just told you what I thought. And when I that it was upsetting me too much and I didn't want to get caught up in those bad feelings, I left. I refrained. I didn't realize there was a question you wanted answered from me and I ignored and that caused offence.



__________________

“Fear is a strange soil. It grows obedience like corn, which grow in straight lines to make weeding easier. But sometimes it grows the potatoes of defiance, which flourish underground.”

― Terry Pratchett, Small Gods.

 
 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Tir Airgid wrote:
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

So right of conquest applies all round. If you can seize it, it's yours by right. Such are the rules of Conquest. 


I profoundly disagree with this statement. There isn't such a thing as a "right" of conquest. You might be able to do as you want with something if you are able to steal it and strong enough to hold it, but that doesn't give you a right over it. It is not "rightfully" yours. The only things that are rightfully yours are whatever you create with your own hands and mind. The rest you may possess whether it belongs to you or not. But it isn't your "right" to do so just cause you could take it.


 Of course these are today's rules. No one plays by them anymore, but back then right of conquest still applied. It's like a soccer player complaining when RUgby players picks up the ball, it's not the same game, it has different sets of rules. According to today's standards I fully agree with you, however for back then I do not. 

Before the Muslim conquests of the Holy Land and Egypt, it was one of the areas that was most populated by Christians. The Muslims changed that. But let's be frank the real reason for the Crusades was yes to stop Europe from squabling amongst one another (honestly though if I knew the only way I could bring peace to my homeland was to give a common enemy, can't say I wouldn't do it too) was wealth. The Holy Land controlled much of the trade in the east. That's the real reason for going. 

I'm not debating who was the better ruler or whose it really was (in which case the Canaanites get the nod). The medieval Christians were so far from what the name really meant it's quite tragic. Balian did prevent a second massacre of Jerusalem with some good leadership and brilliant defending. But nonetheless I'm not picking a side and saying they should have won or they should have ruled. 

My original point came from the discussion about propaganda last night and how the propoganda perpetrated by Pope Urban the Innocent was quite brilliant and brutally effective and I am admitting that had I been a medieval knight, I would've fallen for it too. Yes there were men who went purely cause of their faith and really thought they were doing God's will. But that just illustrates once more the danger of someone claiming to know the will of God for someone else I quote the Teplar Priest played by David Thewlis in Kingdom "I put no stock in religion. By the word religion I have seen the lunacy of fanatics of every denomination be called the will of god. I have seen too much religion in the eyes of too many murderers. Holiness is in right action, and courage on behalf of those who cannot defend themselves, and goodness. What god desires is here [points to head: and here [points to heart: and what you decide to do every day, you will be a good man - or not."



__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Goddess of Tits and Wine
Status: Offline
Posts: 1830
Date:
Permalink  
 
JUst to lighten things up a little ... Aegon , what did Richard have on his Coat of arms thing on his chest?

__________________

  That is what I do . . I drink and I know things 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 

Three Golden Lions on a field of Red, very Lannister looking. 

http://www.gophoto.it/view.php?i=http://www.saburchill.com/history/chapters/project5/images/060209001.jpg



__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Goddess of Tits and Wine
Status: Offline
Posts: 1830
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aha! Apparently not! You fell into my trap .... they were called leopards when then were on the ground and Lions when they were on their hind legs (Scottish heraldry) it was on a program last night and I thought of you ! (seemingly they didn't know any difference between Lions and leopards )

__________________

  That is what I do . . I drink and I know things 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
hahaha but you and I know better don't we? Leopords don't have manes.

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Wielder of the Baratheon BANHAMMER
Status: Offline
Posts: 4430
Date:
Permalink  
 
Oh you did it now Aegon! Imma gonna get my popcorn! ( love the topic BTW)

__________________

"Robert was never the same after he put on that crown. Some men are like swords, made for fighting. Hang them up and they go to rust.” -DN

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Hahahaha thanks DNA, like in real world history, sparks fly here as well. Next topic up for debate, was Caligula framed? I just read the most freaky and chilling comic series about him! That horse....It's enough to give you nightmares!

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 

That history can be done or write or discuss objectively it´s a 19th century concept from German Historicism and French Positivism and a lie. There is no such thing. History we know was written by the victorious, so is tinged with ideology. You can not avoid personal opinions and is not desirable to do so. The only desirable thing is to be polite and patient. History is personal, it reveals the depth and truth of your convictions, my dear Aegon.
I´m pretty weak at medieval history so I will stay away for now. The most interesting thing about Medievalism for me, till now, it´s economics and don´t know much either about that so I hold my peace



__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

Mistress Of The Coin
Status: Offline
Posts: 1823
Date:
Permalink  
 
Andrea, economics would be the most interesting aspect to me too, not historical figures. Economics and geography are the basis for the political and social realities of any civilization. Little else matters if you look at a broad enough period of time. Individual leaders are largely a product of geopolitics, and are rarely able to transcend its realities once they are in positions of leadership. Certain borders will always have to be protected, whether by conquest, alliance or militarization. Certain resources will always have to be procured, leading to strange bedfellows and political decisions that are inexplicable from any other perspective. That's where my interest lies, those broader considerations that transcend individual battles, leaders and political boundaries.


__________________
Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 
Black as Snow wrote:

That's where my interest lies, those broader considerations that transcend individual battles, leaders and political boundaries.


 This is how you study history as a whole nowadays, if you have good teachers. This is what gives you the best perspective on the world, not event-based history. On the other hand, this is what makes it less attractive for the general public. I'm actually surprised you feel this way, BaS, because usually people outside the academia don't have the interest or the patience to go looking for 'the bigger picture' (social, economical etc). Then again, you being you, this shouldn't come as a surprise.  

What andrea says is 100% true. The first thing that I've learned when I began studying history in college is that history is not (or should not) be a science that studies what happened in the past, but the discourse on what happened. History is not and will never be objective, because the people writing it cannot be objective. As a historian you should be balanced, and strive for objectivity, knowing also that you will never achieve it. Every text you study has gone through at least one personal filter. In the case of ancient texts, it's gone through tens or even hundreds, because of the copying and translations. So it's impossible to establish the truth. You can confront various sources and see what matches - it's easier for deaths and battles and marriages. But you can never truly know the inner workings of somebody's mind, unless they left a journal and even then you have to consider that perspective as being distorted to some degree. To conclude, for me it's way more interesting to look at the perception of a certain event or historical figure, than simply retelling that event all over again or trying to play detective.



__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
While we are on the subject of Economics, why don't we discuss how economics led to the wiping out of three quarters of Europe's population. Ring a ring rosies anyone?

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 
Macha wrote:

 This is how you study history as a whole nowadays, if you have good teachers. This is what gives you the best perspective on the world, not event-based history. On the other hand, this is what makes it less attractive for the general public. I'm actually surprised you feel this way, BaS, because usually people outside the academia don't have the interest or the patience to go looking for 'the bigger picture' (social, economical etc). Then again, you being you, this shouldn't come as a surprise.  


 I was telling her last night exactly that.  She´s full of surprises.

Annales, the historiographical school, was instrumental in the creation of my university programs but, living in the third world it is logical that our institutions are more inclined to Social History, micro history, English historians of the Industrial Revolution and the misfits like Walter Benjamin and some others.

Medievalists though, like Duby (Annales school) are great writers, almost novelists,  that emphasize long-term social and economic processes,  I think you´ll love it Bas. You should check his books.



__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

Mistress Of The Coin
Status: Offline
Posts: 1823
Date:
Permalink  
 
Macha wrote:
Black as Snow wrote:

That's where my interest lies, those broader considerations that transcend individual battles, leaders and political boundaries.


 This is how you study history as a whole nowadays, if you have good teachers. This is what gives you the best perspective on the world, not event-based history. On the other hand, this is what makes it less attractive for the general public. I'm actually surprised you feel this way, BaS, because usually people outside the academia don't have the interest or the patience to go looking for 'the bigger picture' (social, economical etc). Then again, you being you, this shouldn't come as a surprise.  


I take that as a compliment.  You have my sincere thanks.  I didn't realize it was a method of study, and I'm pleased to hear it. It gives me hope for academia. 

Event-based history, as you call it, is fun and sexy.  It's like eating candy, as opposed to the heartier meal of the long-term view.  But the broader perspective is much more intellectually challenging and is is the basis for what's happening in the world today.  And that's why it interests me.  The mechanics behind why China has to control Tibet and Russia needs to hold sway over Lithuania and Turkey is likely to become a resurgent power are independent of time and personality.  And the events of the past in these areas are destined to repeat themselves endlessly because of these independent factors.  So it's more about tying the past to the present for me than anything.  I don't have patience for the details of what happened to whom when.  I want the why and how the why is significant for right now. 



__________________
Mistress Of The Coin
Status: Offline
Posts: 1823
Date:
Permalink  
 
andrea wrote:
Medievalists though, like Duby (Annales school) are great writers, almost novelists,  that emphasize long-term social and economic processes,  I think you´ll love it Bas. You should check his books.

 I will make a point of it, Andrea.  Thanks for pointing me in the right direction. 



__________________
High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Andrea your history bout all the things you mentioned still beats ours. Only thing that we are taught is Apartheid and the struggle. You have any idea how depressing it is to be taught over and over that your parents and their parents are tyrannical monsters who should be shot for what they did?

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 

Aegon, the history that they teach in school or highschool is very badly handled here as well, but that doesn't mean that it's the same at higher levels. Or is it? In any case, another thing that I've personally learned in college was that you only need to learn how to study history, from there on it's individual study. You just need to know how to look at things, after that you can learn everything yourself. 

Andrea, yes the good old Annales school of thought. Same thing here, we're very much French-oriented, at least with the study of the Middle Ages. Duby is my absolute favorite! BaS if you ever want to read a very good collection of history books, this is for you. You will not be bored, I guarantee it. They're pretty massive though. 



__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Well at least you get diversity. With ours it's basically just Apartheid, which should be taught, I agree it's an important part of our history. But the way the Education system presents it has two effects on teachers, the first is white teachers who get very negative with the way the history is portrayed and how whites are made to look like villains across the board. 2 get spirited away and get very anti white and believe that not enough has been done to pay them back for what they did.
So trust me yours is better, I'd much rather have learn't about the Industrial Revolution, World War II, the Renaissance etc. To give you an idea how bad it was, in my second year of High School, pressure from various circles forced the government to introduce the outline of World War II, kids were basically just required to know who started it, the turning point and how it ended. The teacher knew so little that he said this, "So Japan bombs America at Pearl Harbour, I'm sure you all saw the movie. America joins the war. They drop two Atomic Bombs on Japan, they surrender. Next they threaten to do the same to Berlin. Germany surrenders and Hitler commits suicide." I nearly threw my rugby ball at his head!
So yeah Macha, yours is better!

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Goddess of Tits and Wine
Status: Offline
Posts: 1830
Date:
Permalink  
 
Well if you ask Hollywood Aegon ... that is was happened isn't it? ;p

__________________

  That is what I do . . I drink and I know things 

 

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 

 

 Aegon, I can´t say anything about your education but I wish our years of military coups were remembered enough in our education. We have 30.000 missing, tortured people. The military stole babies from their mothers' wombs. That sort of thing must be remembered.



__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
Didn't U2 write a song about the missing children? Mother's of the Disappeared. .

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 
Aegon the Conqueror wrote:

Didn't U2 write a song about the missing children? Mother's of the Disappeared. .


 U2? don´t remember but Sting yes, he did that many years ago but just for the mothers and grandmothers of the "disappeared", the ones with the white scarves (?) on their heads. Should look for a pic.

Here



-- Edited by andrea on Saturday 3rd of November 2012 12:53:25 PM

__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 

It is indeed dedicated to the Mothers you speak of, first time I heard it it brought tears to my eyes. One of my favourite U2 songs. 



__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 

that clip is from Chile Aegon. This video is from an Amnesty International concert here and those are our Mothers of "Plaza de Mayo". I don´t know what to think about this though. 

 



__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

High King and Conqueror of the Seven Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1399
Date:
Permalink  
 
The clips might be from Chile, but the video is unofficial. It's that very concert that served as inspiration for the song.

__________________

AS private parts we are to the gods, they play with us for their sport. 

Banned in Six Kingdoms
Status: Offline
Posts: 1161
Date:
Permalink  
 

Let's go for the trifecta for politically-conscious artists.



Sting and Bono can lick Peter's ass.



__________________

As soon as those cameras are off I am going to fuck that little dog.

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 

I truly love P. Gabriel, sometimes I wonder about this political awareness though. Am I getting old????no



__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

Priestess of R'hllor
Status: Offline
Posts: 3348
Date:
Permalink  
 
andrea wrote:

 We have 30.000 missing, tortured people. The military stole babies from their mothers' wombs. That sort of thing must be remembered.


 Have you seen the movie Imagining Argentina, andrea? If so, what did you make of it? It's very brutal, but it stayed with me.



__________________

"Fuck you, Andy Pandy. I AM the loop."

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 
Macha wrote:
andrea wrote:

 We have 30.000 missing, tortured people. The military stole babies from their mothers' wombs. That sort of thing must be remembered.


 Have you seen the movie Imagining Argentina, andrea? If so, what did you make of it? It's very brutal, but it stayed with me.


 I don´t think so Macha, I should check.



__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

Mistress of the Rookery
Status: Offline
Posts: 1955
Date:
Permalink  
 
Macha wrote:

 Have you seen the movie Imagining Argentina, andrea? If so, what did you make of it? It's very brutal, but it stayed with me.


 yep, saw it. I forgot, maybe because it´s a bad movie. Poorly directed, the acting is terrible. Ugh, Banderas is a disaster. The only thing I like about it was Rubén Blades, just because he sings so nice and wrote Decisions and Pedro Navaja.

What can I say Macha? I think the Mothers of Plaza de Mayo must have felt awful watching this movie. The resource you know, the visions just horrible. I could understand the analogy (almost a consolation, crappy one tho) but these women didn´t had that, some of them still don´t have any answer about their sons and daughters and granchildren...and probably never will. I think it´s cruel. And shitty drama.

It´s not that brutal, some other movies are worst, more real. I don´t know, we could talk about it but it´s hard. Show the brutality... not show the brutality. I don´t have an answer.  There is some historical truth there but very circumstantial. To be historically correct ... means something in this case? don´t know for whom this film was made.

It's all true, helicopters throwing drugged, alive people into the River Plate (Río de la Plata), shattered and closed theaters, mass shootings, all true, and even crueler things but be true to that does not make a good movie... maybe. Or just not only that.
It was filmed in scenic spots you know, tourist places, the pampa, San Telmo´s and La Boca neighborhoods ...  it´s not for argentinians I guess. It shows the right (and true) places where things happened but it´s means nothing.
Another obnoxious resource was the poor owl, . And the last scene at the carnival... c´mon, a pathetic carnival that was.  The directing is painful.
We are the only country in Latin America that judged and is still judging its military. This film lies about it. That´s creepy.
I understand it stayed with you of course cause you´re not argentinian but it´s not a good movie.
There´s a new movie, "Infancia perdida" (lost childhood), I´ll check and tell you later.


__________________

 Messi has been and will always be one of my favorite players. It broke my heart a little bit that he didn't win today. Messi is awesome in every way. But Sean Penn still sucks all the dicks. Atat.

 

 

 

 
1 2  >  Last»  | Page of 2  sorted by
Quick Reply

Please log in to post quick replies.

Chatbox

Please log in to join the chat!

*NO book spoilers are allowed in chat*